Therapeutic Nurse Patient Relationship Essay

Nurse Patient Relationship Essay

As suggested by Bungay (2005), the development of a strong nurse-patient relationship begins with nursing practices that demonstrate caring. The act of caring has been identified by Roach (1987) as involving five qualities that establish a caring nursing practice. Further, high quality nursing care must be competent and stem from various sources of knowledge such as empirical, ethical, personal, esthetic, and sociopolitical knowledge (Bungay, 2005). The context in which nursing care and knowledge are applied to patients in clinical settings also drastically influence the positive or negative direction of nurse-patient relationships. As in the case of Allison the nurse, caring using Roach’s caring qualities along with applying her nursing knowledge in specific contextual factors facilitate her ability to provide quality nursing care. In this paper, Allison’s scenario will be analyzed for her ability to care, apply ways of knowing, and how context hindered or facilitated nursing care.

The five qualities of caring identified by Roach (1987) were evident throughout the case study involving Allison the nurse. Allison demonstrated competence in her nursing practice in multiple ways in the case study. Firstly, she gathered notes for any necessary information from report in order to provide herself a good foundation to provide good nursing care. Further, she constantly drew from her past experiences in order to make sense of the current happenings and thus, determined how to react appropriately. For example, in the case of Mr. Nelson, Allison was able to make sense of his anger and recognize the significance of his hospitalization and his current disposition by being a competent communicator and having “several short talks” with him. Further, Allison demonstrated competence when assessing Mr. Nelson’s status simply by having a conversation with him. She was able to competently use the cardiac monitoring machine to assess and clinically interpret his vital signs, observe how many liters of oxygen he was on, his colour, and his work of breathing. From this information, she confidently concluded that Mr. Nelson’s oxygen supply and demand was balanced. Also in the case of Mr. Nelson, Allison was demonstrating competent nursing by gathering all the observed clinical data and medical history. With this, she was able to make competent clinical judgment in suggesting that Mr. Nelson was experiencing nicotine withdrawal and how she would intervene. Allison was able to prioritize the acuity of her patients in order to competently determine which patient she should tend to and assess first.

Allison demonstrated compassion by empathizing with Mr. Nelson based on the interactions she previously had with him. In the case study, she explored his feelings regarding his current hospitalization in order to understand and empathize with his anger. To begin such conversation, Allison needed to recognize the need for individualized care by assessing his demeanor and mood....

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A therapeutic relationship is a key component in the nursing profession. Without therapeutic relationships, the best possible care can never be provided. The foundation in which trust is built upon is created from the nurse’s ability to truly listen and respond appropriately. Listening creates the base in developing a strong, trusting relationship. Sometimes it is simply hearing what a patient says that makes all the difference, empowering them to open up and become more comfortable with the nurse (Hawkins-Walsh, 2000). The framework for creating a therapeutic relationship is built on the nurse’s ability to show empathy towards the client. Empathy is being able to put oneself in the patient’s shoes, to feel the same things they feel…show more content…

Respect is something as simple as treating everyone equally regardless of age, colour, weight, beliefs, gender, sexual orientation and so on. If Irene is respected, she will feel more comfortable in her environment and less stressed (Gallagher, 2007). Additional components such as caring support the nurse-client relationship; a nurse who is able to truly care for Irene will develop a strong bond with her. Caring for a client is taking the time to treat them like they matter and looking past their illness and recognizing the unique individual that they are (Johnstone, 2010). Genuineness is being authentic towards a client. Irene will respond more freely and honestly to a nurse who is genuine. A nurse is genuine by maintaining meaning behind what they say or ask and by actually caring rather than running through the motions (Van Manen, 2002).
Listening plays a vital role in developing a relationship. Allowing Irene to do most of the talking prompts her to discuss her problems and relieves stress (Brammer, 2003). Presence is more than being physically near a patient. It is the combination of being mentally, emotionally and physically present. Irene will be more at ease knowing the nurse is close by (Zikorus, 2007).
Therapeutic relationships ease and comfort a client`s mind. A full-bodied therapeutic relationship fosters a comfortable environment constituting contentment, thus decreasing anxiety levels (Gardner,

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