Feminist Science Fiction Bibliography Meaning

Your browser is not secure

You're seeing this page because your web browser tried to connect to Warwick's website with insecure settings. Please upgrade your web browser.

The TLS 1.0 encryption protocol is disabled across the University's web services. Disabling TLS 1.0 prevents it from being used to access Warwick websites via an insecure web browser or application. We've made this change to keep the University's websites safe and secure.

What do I need to do?

When accessing websites using a web browser, ensure you use the latest available version of the browser – whether that is Internet Explorer, Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Safari or another browser. Using the latest version keeps you safe online because you're using the most up-to-date security settings.

Why is this happening?

Although TLS 1.0, when configured properly, has no known security vulnerabilities, newer protocols are designed better to address the potential for new vulnerabilities.

The PCI Data Security Standard 3.1 recommends disabling “early TLS”:

“SSL and early TLS are not considered strong cryptography and cannot be used as a security control after June 30, 2016 [without a mitigation strategy for disabling it before June 2018].

[...]

The best response is to disable SSL entirely and migrate to a more modern encryption protocol, which at the time of publication is a minimum of TLS v1.1, although entities are strongly encouraged to consider TLS v1.2.”

We need to be PCI-compliant to take online payments at the University. It is not sufficient to merely disable TLS 1.0 on our transaction tracking system as the requirement extends to any system that initiates a payment, including car parking, printer credits, the Warwick website, etc.


The following bibliography of science fiction criticism does not claim to be exhaustive. It does, however, gather together a large number of critical materials on sf that the editors of SFS deem to be important, influential, or historically noteworthy. We have listed the entries in reverse chronological order since such a format, we feel, affords a useful glimpse of the evolution of sf criticism from 1634 to the present. In those cases where items listed on the bibliography have either been reviewed in SFS or featured in our Documents in the History of SF series, we have inserted links to the relevant pages.

In consulting this collective bibliography, our readers should be aware of certain methodological and editorial assumptions we made in compiling it. First, there are very few references herein to critical works that focus primarily on utopias; these are treated quite extensively in scholarly journals like Utopian Studies and in books by Lyman Tower Sargent and others. Second, rather than citing numerous individual reviews and essays by well-known critics or authors, as a rule we have preferred to list relevant compendia--e.g., John Clute's Strokes (1988) or his Look at the Evidence (1995)--even though, in many cases, the material gathered in these volumes was written much earlier. Third, we have excluded from this list most anthologies of sf, author biographies and interviews, works of theory that do not focus primarily on sf, and general bibliographies of sf (which tend to date rapidly from the moment they are published).

The original version of this critical bibliography appeared in the special issue of SFS "A History of Science Fiction Criticism" (26.2 [July 1999]: 263-83), where it served as the collective Works Cited for survey articles on the topic by Arthur B. Evans, Gary Westfahl, Donald M. Hassler, and Veronica Hollinger.

 

0 thoughts on “Feminist Science Fiction Bibliography Meaning

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *